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insooutso:

Word.

insooutso:

Word.

pbstv:

Commemorate the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the most famous ocean liner by visiting our Titanic collection page.
Watch new programs airing this month on PBS. Explore a selection of archival Titanic content, ranging from videos to interactive games and timelines.
Today’s featured video: “The Titanic with Len Goodman.”

Image: Scene from “Saving the Titanic”

pbstv:

Commemorate the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the most famous ocean liner by visiting our Titanic collection page.

Watch new programs airing this month on PBS. Explore a selection of archival Titanic content, ranging from videos to interactive games and timelines.

Today’s featured video: “The Titanic with Len Goodman.”

Image: Scene from “Saving the Titanic”

infoneer-pulse:

A Texas University’s Mind-Boggling Database Of Teens’ Daily Text Messages, Emails, and IMs Over Four Years

Underwood somehow got the project approved by the IRB, received a $3.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), hooked up with Ceryx and Global Relay — companies that help financial companies capture employee communication per SEC rules — and got over 175 of her 281 participants to sign up for the Digital Panopticon. (Some students dropped out because they preferred iPhones to Blackberries, says Underwood.) The kids and their parents have to sign “detailed consent forms” yearly. There are 81 girls and 94 boys; 23% of them are African-American, 50% are Caucasian, and 15% are Hispanic. Nearly half come from families that make less that $75K per year. Other than paying participants $50 for lab visits, the only financial compensation is the phone and its associated plan, which comes out to a little over $600 per person.
The kids are now high school seniors; the capture of their digital communications over the past four years provides an intimate look at their private lives. There have been countless studies about how kids use technology, but this detailed collection is the first of its kind.
Previous studies have involved looking at teens’ social networking pages, blogs, and chat rooms — all publicly available. “No previous published research has provided adolescents with cell phones or smart phones and recorded the content of their electronic communication,” write the researchers in a recent paper. “The only previous study that measured the content of text messaging required college students to write down all text messages for a 24-hr period in a diary.”
Not as good, obviously.

» via Forbes

infoneer-pulse:

A Texas University’s Mind-Boggling Database Of Teens’ Daily Text Messages, Emails, and IMs Over Four Years

Underwood somehow got the project approved by the IRB, received a $3.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), hooked up with Ceryx and Global Relay — companies that help financial companies capture employee communication per SEC rules — and got over 175 of her 281 participants to sign up for the Digital Panopticon. (Some students dropped out because they preferred iPhones to Blackberries, says Underwood.) The kids and their parents have to sign “detailed consent forms” yearly. There are 81 girls and 94 boys; 23% of them are African-American, 50% are Caucasian, and 15% are Hispanic. Nearly half come from families that make less that $75K per year. Other than paying participants $50 for lab visits, the only financial compensation is the phone and its associated plan, which comes out to a little over $600 per person.

The kids are now high school seniors; the capture of their digital communications over the past four years provides an intimate look at their private lives. There have been countless studies about how kids use technology, but this detailed collection is the first of its kind.

Previous studies have involved looking at teens’ social networking pages, blogs, and chat rooms — all publicly available. “No previous published research has provided adolescents with cell phones or smart phones and recorded the content of their electronic communication,” write the researchers in a recent paper. “The only previous study that measured the content of text messaging required college students to write down all text messages for a 24-hr period in a diary.”

Not as good, obviously.

» via Forbes

I can hope, I can daydream, but certainly think that the chances of me being read 50 years from now or 100 years from now are probably not good. That cannot be your only end. You cannot write to be immortal because you will never know. It’s impossible. Just write as well as you can and don’t speculate about whether you will be Chaucer or Shakespeare.
writer Donald Hall on NPR’s Fresh Air (via forwhenifeellikesharing)
discoverynews:

Mars Viking Robots ‘Found Life’
New analysis of 36-year-old data, resuscitated from printouts, shows NASA found life on Mars, an international team of mathematicians and scientists conclude in a paper published this week.
Further, NASA doesn’t need a human expedition to Mars to nail down the claim, neuropharmacologist and biologist Joseph Miller, with the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, told Discovery News.
“The ultimate proof is to take a video of a Martian bacteria. They should send a microscope — watch the bacteria move,” Miller said.
“On the basis of what we’ve done so far, I’d say I’m 99 percent sure there’s life there,” he added.
keep reading

discoverynews:

Mars Viking Robots ‘Found Life’

New analysis of 36-year-old data, resuscitated from printouts, shows NASA found life on Mars, an international team of mathematicians and scientists conclude in a paper published this week.

Further, NASA doesn’t need a human expedition to Mars to nail down the claim, neuropharmacologist and biologist Joseph Miller, with the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, told Discovery News.

“The ultimate proof is to take a video of a Martian bacteria. They should send a microscope — watch the bacteria move,” Miller said.

“On the basis of what we’ve done so far, I’d say I’m 99 percent sure there’s life there,” he added.

keep reading

wordbrooklyn:


WORD is proud to announce the complete details for our pre-World Book Night bash this Sunday! We really love the mission of World Book Night and want to celebrate it with you, as well as the Greenpoint Soup Kitchen and Food Pantry, an organization which we work with year-round to help get books to Greenpointers in need. At our party (7pm at The Diamond, April 22), we’ll be asking for a suggested donation of $5, all of which which will go to the Soup Kitchen. 


As a special treat, we will be there at 7pm sharp with a supply of free drink tickets so show up early and ready to celebrate! Free drinks are thanks to the generosity of our friends at W. W. Norton (publishers of World Book Night book The History of Love) and Small Demons.


We’ll have fabulous authors on hand (all WBN givers) to make the party a little fancier: Sean Ferrell, Jim Hanas, Katie Kitamura, Julie Klam, Emily St. John Mandel, Travis Nichols, Olegbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich, Rachel Shukert, Emma Straub, and Colleen Venable. All givers will wear a nametag with the title of their WBN book and the place they’ll be giving it away.


You do not have to be picking up your WBN books at WORD, or even a WBN giver at all, to attend; you just have to dig books. 


But! If you want to be a giver and missed the sign-up, don’t fret! We have 15 or so extra boxes of books to hand out to last-minute givers. Please email Stephanie at stephanie at wordbrooklyn to get a list of available books and get on our giver list. First come, first served.

wordbrooklyn:

WORD is proud to announce the complete details for our pre-World Book Night bash this Sunday! We really love the mission of World Book Night and want to celebrate it with you, as well as the Greenpoint Soup Kitchen and Food Pantry, an organization which we work with year-round to help get books to Greenpointers in need. At our party (7pm at The Diamond, April 22), we’ll be asking for a suggested donation of $5, all of which which will go to the Soup Kitchen. 


As a special treat, we will be there at 7pm sharp with a supply of free drink tickets so show up early and ready to celebrate! Free drinks are thanks to the generosity of our friends at W. W. Norton (publishers of World Book Night book The History of Love) and Small Demons.


We’ll have fabulous authors on hand (all WBN givers) to make the party a little fancier: Sean Ferrell, Jim Hanas, Katie Kitamura, Julie Klam, Emily St. John Mandel, Travis Nichols, Olegbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich, Rachel Shukert, Emma Straub, and Colleen Venable. All givers will wear a nametag with the title of their WBN book and the place they’ll be giving it away.


You do not have to be picking up your WBN books at WORD, or even a WBN giver at all, to attend; you just have to dig books.


But! If you want to be a giver and missed the sign-up, don’t fret! We have 15 or so extra boxes of books to hand out to last-minute givers. Please email Stephanie at stephanie at wordbrooklyn to get a list of available books and get on our giver list. First come, first served.
In coming years, we will have to ask ourselves if public policies should be based on the advice of experts who have carried out robust and rigorous analysis of the evidence, or if they should be guided by lobbyists who appear driven by narrow ideological dogma.
Bob Ward of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change, in The Guardian’s, “Attacks paid for by big business are ‘driving science into a dark era  (via thegreenurbanist)
The monetization model of online publishing — a legacy model that hasn’t changed since the golden age of newspapers — is breeding even more mediocre and questionable content. Because this model puts the advertiser, not the reader, first, we suffer the same atrocities a newspaper editor lamented in 1923 when he bemoaned the way in which the circulation manager had taken over the newspaper and eclipsed the editor. As long as the ad-supported pageview remains the main currency of funding writing online, we’ll continue getting slideshows about kittens, HuffPost-ified sensationalist headlines, one-page articles artificially split into five pages, and other such assaults on the reader. To have intelligent readers, we need intelligent writers, certainly, but also intelligent publishing. I hope to see this ecosystem evolve towards a meritocracy, where content gets published because it is good, and because readers find value in it and are willing to put a price on this value. Reading is voting for writing, and I hope to see our votes count for more than they currently do.

Maria Popova (via nedhepburn)

Oh hey! We had this exact conversation yesterday, over kombucha and Kate Beaton comics.

(via rachelfershleiser)

Gospel Writers

lareviewofbooks:

BRIALLEN HOPPER on Christianity and homosexuality

and ERICA WETTER on Jeff Sharlet’s Sweet Heaven When I Die.

BRIALLEN HOPPER

Strange Bedfellows


Dan Savage and Terry Miller, editors
It Gets Better: Coming Out, Overcoming Bullying, and Creating a Life Worth Living

Plume, January 2012. 352 pp.

Mark D. Jordan
Recruiting Young Love: How Christians Talk About Homosexuality

University of Chicago Press, April 2011. 296 pp.

Jimmy Creech
Adam’s Gift: A Memoir of a Pastor’s Calling to Defy the Church’s Persecution of Lesbians and Gays

Duke University Press, March 2011. 362 pp.

Christopher Yuan and Angela Yuan
Out of a Far Country: A Gay Son’s Journey to God. A Broken Mother’s Search for Hope

WaterBrook Press, May 2011. 222 pp.

Last year, the school where I work — Yale University, colloquially known as “the Gay Ivy” — was galvanized by a visit from the Christian speaker Christopher Yuan, a self-described “former homosexual.” A student evangelical group had invited Yuan to campus to tell the story of his transformation from out-and-proud gay meth addict and drug dealer to mild-mannered celibate Bible teacher via a stint in federal prison. Yale’s outraged LGBTQ and allied students showed up in droves and passed out rainbow stickers at the door, turning what had been planned as an intimate evangelical event into a fraught, standing-room-only campus happening.

Yuan’s visit and the impassioned protest it provoked might seem to confirm the common perception that gays and Christians play for different teams. But they also call that assumption into question. Queer Christian students helped to organize the protest, and more than one gay clergyperson from the community was there as well. Meanwhile, the decision to invite Yuan was quite controversial within the evangelical student groups, and I heard that some LGBTQ-allied evangelical students were boycotting the event as an informal protest of their own. At the time I was a student at Yale Divinity School, and I attended the talk with a large cohort of queer and allied ministers-in-training. Many of us had grown up in or been thrown out of churches that preached hate, and we wanted to make sure that we were there as witnesses for the gospel as we had come to know it — a hard-won gospel of love and liberation for all.

We were also there for the show, and it didn’t disappoint. Nothing quite beats anti-gay melodrama for sheer camp value. Yuan, a Chinese-American, HIV-positive man in his forties, travels the world with his formidable mother, Angela, showing PowerPoint pictures of his former self dancing in leather and glitter, and speaking out in favor of “holy sexuality,” which he defines as incompatible with same-sex desire. To hear Christopher tell it, Angela is a kind of Tiger Mother for Jesus: She simply refused to accept that her son was hopelessly gay, and that (eventually) was that. At Yale, Angela cut short the heated question and answer period by demanding that gay and allied students go easy on her son since his white blood cell count was low and it was time for him to take his meds.

Christopher and Angela have written a book together, Out of a Far Country: A Gay Son’s Journey to God. A Broken Mother’s Search for Hope, in which they each cast themselves in the role of the Prodigal Son. In alternating chapters, they tell how they were both brought low by Christopher’s homosexual lifestyle. When Angela saw the gay porn that Christopher had hidden in the insulation in the crawl space by his bedroom, she contemplated throwing herself in front of a train. And when Christopher dropped out of dental school to plan gay dance parties, he found himself alone and emaciated, a crack pipe his only friend. After years of wallowing in shame, mother and son finally found their way back home to a life with Jesus and each other.

In some ways, the Yuans are telling an old story. Parts of it are as old as the parable on which it is based. But it is also new. The Yuans’ decision to present themselves as fellow prodigals in need of forgiveness — rather than casting Christopher alone as the sinner — is an especially interesting twist. It makes Angela’s initial rejection of her gay son into a sin somehow comparable to the “sin” of Christopher’s homosexuality.

And Christopher’s relationship to his homosexuality is more nuanced (or contradictory) than it might first appear. Although he has worked with the ex-gay organization Exodus International, at Yale he disavowed “ex-gay” rhetoric, saying, “I don’t even know what the ex-gay movement is.” In his book, Christopher writes that he is not defined by his sexuality, past or present, and that his only meaningful identity is Christian; his goal is not heterosexuality but purity. Still, at Yale, he kept returning to sexual labels with a half-affirming wistfulness. At one point he said with tears in his voice, “I have a lot of gay friends. I have some who have passed away. LGBTQ family is dear to me.” Maybe in memory of this lost gay family, he interspersed his talk with conciliating pleas to his predominantly gay and politely hostile audience: “I want to get to know you.” “Let’s start with love.”

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dotomaz:

Na twitterju, forumih in novičarskih straneh, ki pokrivajo digitalno tehniko, smo pogsto priča prepirom med zagovornikim posameznih operacijskih sistemom. Pa naj bo to Windows vs Linux, Windows vs OSX, ali OSX vs Linux. Vsak sistem ima svoje prednosti in slabosti, v katere se v tem članku ne bom…